an autodidact meets a dilettante…

‘Rise above yourself and grasp the world’ Archimedes – attribution

Archive for the ‘lipids’ Category

How statins work 1 – stuff about cholesterol, saturated fats and lipoproteins…

leave a comment »

filched from Wikipedia – don’y worry, I don’t understand it either – at least not yet

Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, according to Wikipedia’s first sentence on the topic. HMG-CoA reductase is an enzyme – a macromolecule that accelerates or catalyses chemical reactions in cells. The enzyme works in the mevalonate pathway, which produces cholesterol and other terpenoids (terpenoids are very common, varied and useful forms of hydrocarbon).

So what does HMG-CoA stand for, and what’s a reductase?

3 hydroxy -3 methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A, which may be explained later. A reductase is an enzyme which catalyses a reduction reaction, and I’m not sure if that refers to redox reactions, in which case reduction involves the gaining of electrons…

But let’s look at cholesterol, which statins are used against. Sterols are lipid molecules with a polar OH component, and ‘chole’, meaning bile, comes from the liver. So cholesterol is a type of lipid molecule produced largely by the liver or hepatic cells of vertebrate animals. Cholesterol is essential for life, and it’s synthesised in the cell via a complex 37-step process (the mevalonate pathway makes up the first 18 of these). It makes up about 30% of our cell membranes, and its continual production is necessary to maintain cell membrane structure and fluidity. In high food-intake countries such as Australia and the US, we ingest about 300mg of cholesterol a day on average. We also have an intake of phytosterols, produced by plants, which might vary from 200-300mgs. Of course, this is massively dependent on individual diets (increased phytosterol intake may reduce LDL cholesterol, but it comes with its own quite serious problems).

The (very basic) structure of cholesterol is shown below.

The body of the molecule (centre) contains 4 rings of carbon and hydrogen – A, B and C are 6-carbon rings, while D has 5. The bonds between rings A and B, and C and D, represent methyl groups. On the left is a hydroxyl group, which is hydrophilic and polar, though the massive body of the molecule is extremely hydrophobic, which is reinforced by the cholesterol tail connected to the D ring. The hydroxyl polarity creates a binding site, which builds structure as the molecule binds to others.

Interestingly, the need for cholesterol synthesis varies with temperature, or climate. This has to do with fluidity and melting points. People who live in colder climates require less cholesterol production because, in cold weather, solid structure remains intact. Hotter climates cause greater fluidity and increased entropy, so more cholesterol needs to be synthesised to create and maintain structure.

So now to the 18-step mevalonate pathway, by which the liver produces lanosterol, the precursor to cholesterol. Well, on second thoughts, maybe not… It’s fiendishly complex and Nobel Prizes have been deservedly won for working it all out and I’m currently thinking that physics is easy-peasy compared to biochemistry (or maybe not). What I’m coming up against is the interconnectivity of everything and the need to be thorough. For example, in order to understand statins we need to understand cholesterol, and in order to understand cholesterol we need to understand lipids, lipoproteins, the liver, the bloodstream, the digestive system… So I sometimes feel overwhelmed but also annoyed at the misinformation everywhere, with chiropractors or ‘MDs’ announcing the ‘truth’ about statins, cholesterol or whatever in 500-word screeds or 5-minute videos.

Anyway, back to work. Cholesterol is a lipid molecule, and lipids are generally hydrophobic (they don’t mix with water, or to be more exact they’re not very soluble in water), but cholesterol has a hydrophilic hydroxyl side to it. Lipids that have this hydrophilic/hydrophobic mix are called amphipathic. Phospholipids in cell membranes are an example. and they interact with cholesterol in the ‘phospholipid bilayer’. As an indication of the complexity involved, here’s a quote from an abstract of a biochemical paper on this very topic:

Mammalian cell membranes are composed of a complex array of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids that vary in head-group and acyl-chain composition. In a given cell type, membrane phospholipids may amount to more than a thousand molecular species. The complexity of phospholipid and sphingolipid structures is most likely a consequence of their diverse roles in membrane dynamics, protein regulation, signal transduction and secretion. This review is mainly focused on two of the major classes of membrane phospholipids in eukaryotic organisms, sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines. These phospholipid classes constitute more than 50% of membrane phospholipids. Cholesterol is most likely to associate with these lipids in the membranes of the cells.

Anyway, perhaps for now at least I won’t explore the essential role of cholesterol in cell structure and function, but the role of ingested cholesterol, the difference between LDL and HDL cholesterol, and how it relates to saturated fats and heart disease, particularly atherosclerosis. As Gregory Roberts explains it in a Cosmos article, saturated fats (found in butter, meat and palm oil) definitely raise total cholesterol…

But what is saturated fat, as opposed to polyunsaturated or mono-unsaturated fat? Most of us have heard of these terms but do we really know what they mean? Here comes Wikipedia to the rescue (because there’s a lot of bullshit out there):.

saturated fat is a type of fat in which the fatty acid chains have all or predominantly single bonds. A fat is made of two kinds of smaller molecules: glycerol and fatty acids. Fats are made of long chains of carbon (C) atoms. Some carbon atoms are linked by single bonds (-C-C-) and others are linked by double bonds (-C=C-). Double bonds can react with hydrogen to form single bonds. They are called saturated, because the second bond is broken and each half of the bond is attached to (saturated with) a hydrogen atom. Most animal fats are saturated. The fats of plants and fish are generally unsaturated. Saturated fats tend to have higher melting points than their corresponding unsaturated fats, leading to the popular understanding that saturated fats tend to be solids at room temperatures, while unsaturated fats tend to be liquid at room temperature with varying degrees of viscosity (meaning both saturated and unsaturated fats are found to be liquid at body temperature).
Various fats contain different proportions of saturated and unsaturated fat. Examples of foods containing a high proportion of saturated fat include animal fat products such as cream, cheese, butter, other whole milk dairy products and fatty meats which also contain dietary cholesterol. Certain vegetable products have high saturated fat content, such as coconut oil and palm kernel oil. Many prepared foods are high in saturated fat content, such as pizza, dairy desserts, and sausage.
Guidelines released by many medical organizations, including the World Health Organization, have advocated for reduction in the intake of saturated fat to promote health and reduce the risk from cardiovascular diseases. Many review articles also recommend a diet low in saturated fat and argue it will lower risks of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, or death. A small number of contemporary reviews have challenged these conclusions, though predominant medical opinion is that saturated fat and cardiovascular disease are closely related.

Saturated Fat, Wikipedia. I’ve removed links and notes – they’re just too much of a good thing! Apologies for the lengthy quote but I think this is essential reading in this context.

High density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol can be a problem if your levels are low. HDL absorbs cholesterol and carries it back to the liver, from where it’s removed from the body. So generally high levels of HDL will reduce your chances of heart attack and stroke.

As Roberts notes, from the 1950s, heart disease has risen to be a major problem. Heart attack victims have been regularly found to have arteries clogged with ‘waxy plaques filled with cholesterol’. Further proof that cholesterol was to blame came with studies of people with a genetic disease – familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) – which meant that they had some five times the normal levels of blood cholesterol, and suffered heart attacks even as children or teenagers. Also, the rise in blood cholesterol levels and the rise in heart attacks, and heart disease generally, were correlated. This was unlikely to be coincidental.

But what’s a lipoprotein and why the different densities? Here we get into another area of extraordinary complexity. Lipoproteins are vehicles for transporting hydrophobic lipid molecules such as cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids through the watery bloodstream or the watery extracellular fluid (blood plasma – the yellowish liquid through which haemoglobin and lipoproteins etc are transported – is a proportion of that fluid). They act as emulsifiers, ‘encapsulating’ the lipids so that they can mix with and move through the fluid. Lipoproteins don’t just come in HD and LD forms – we classify them in terms of their density much as we classify colours in the light (electromagnetic) spectrum. According to that density classification we recognise five major types of lipoprotein in the bloodstream.

Cholesterol arrives in the blood via endogenous (internal) and exogenous (external) pathways. Some 70% of our cholesterol is produced by the liver, so, though diet is an important facet of changing cholesterol levels, finding ways of modifying or blocking liver production was clearly another option. Through studying the way fungi produced chemicals such as penicillin that break down cell walls (a large part of which are cholesterol), Akira Endo was the first to produce a statin from a mould in oranges – mevastatin. That was the beginning of the statin story.

References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mevalonate_pathway

https://cosmosmagazine.com/society/will-statin-day-really-keep-doctor-away

Cholesterol metabolism, part one – video by Ben1994 (excellent)

Cholesterol structure, part 1/2, by Catalyst University

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholesterol

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipoprotein

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturated_fat

Written by stewart henderson

September 15, 2019 at 10:24 am